Many workplaces discourage friendship bonding because they feel that employees will be more interested in talking with their friends rather than doing the tasks at work.  I have worked 23 years in our medical practice with my husband and yes, we have a great friendship.  We have been told that how we have fun and work hard together makes our practice unique.

We also have sisters and best friends working with us and we have encouraged those that did not have relationships before they came to work for us to develop a comfortable relationship between themselves.  I have found by encouraging solid, trusting relationships at work, we have a solid, hard-working team.

There is a clear link between the personal bonds between team members and their engagement levels.  A recent Gallup study found that close work friendships boost employee satisfaction by 50%, while people with a self-described best friend at work are seven times more likely to be fully engaged at work.

Another Gallup study reported that engaged companies consistently outperform the competition when it comes to things like profits, productivity, and turnover.  Our staff members have stayed employed for many years with us, and when they have left the practice for one reason or another we have remained friends and their family still come in for medical treatment.

As a group, we have shared values, high standards and caring hearts for each other, those we serve and our community.  These three things are key factors in deciding who works in our practice.  Being like-minded and like-hearted is the cement that holds our team together.

We are not only coworkers we are family and friends.

Keep moving forward,
Tina

Gallup Why We Need Friends At Work

Gallup Engaged Workplace

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